£230,000 Compensation Payout For Partial Blindness – Advice To Help Calculate Compensation Payouts

£230,000 Compensation Payout For Partial Blindness – Advice To Help Calculate Compensation Payouts

Welcome to our guide on how to make a personal injury claim partial blindness injury compensation. It can be a worrying situation to discover that you’ve suffered an injury that’s resulted in partial blindness. If your sight is compromised, whether the condition is temporary or permanent, the impacts could be life-changing. If your suffering is a result of somebody else’s negligence, you could be eligible to claim compensation.

Partial blindness injury compensation

Partial blindness injury compensation

In this guide, we’ll explain everything from how to determine whether you could have grounds to make a claim to how much compensation you could be entitled to. To help illustrate the claims process, we’ve included an example case study of a road traffic accident victim sustaining a partial blindness injury and receiving £230,000 in compensation after making a claim with help from a personal injury lawyer.

If, at any point, you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with our team of specialist advisors to get a free, no-obligation consultation about your case. They’re available 24/7, 7 days a week and could connect you with our panel of No Win No Fee solicitors if you’d like help making a successful claim:

Choose A Section

  1. A Guide To Claiming Compensation Payouts For A Partial Blindness Injury
  2. What Is A Partial Blindness Injury?
  3. How Can You Suffer A Partial Blindness Injury At Work? 
  4. Partial Blindness Injury In A Public Place 
  5. How Can You Suffer A Partial Blindness Injury In A Road Traffic Accident? 
  6. Learn About The Personal Injury Compensation Calculation Process
  7. What Are Special Damages?
  8. Case Study: £230,000 For A Partial Blindness Injury
  9. Receive Free Legal Advice On Your Case From Us
  10. You Could Benefit From No Win No Fee Claims
  11. Our Specialist Free Legal Advice For You
  12. More Resources And Guides On Partial Blindness Injuries
  13. Partial Blindness Injury FAQs 

A Guide To Claiming Compensation Payouts For A Partial Blindness Injury

As part of this guide, we’ll explain how you could be able to claim compensation for a partial blindness injury. To begin with, we’ll break down what blindness is as well as some typical symptoms that can identify it.

Next, we’ll discuss how to identify third-party negligence in different circumstances and how to make a personal injury claim for it. From there, we’ll provide various examples of scenarios that could lead to someone suffering a partial blindness injury through no fault of their own. To illustrate, we’ll then include our case study.

Finally, we’ll conclude by explaining the benefits of getting legal help on a No Win No Fee basis and introduce you to the service offered by our panel of personal injury lawyers. If, at any point, you’d like to see how they could help you, please get in touch today for a free consultation about your case.

Personal Injury Claims Time Limit

Did you know that personal injury claims, including partial blindness claims, have a 3-year limitation period within which you can make them?

If you suffered as a result of third-party negligence and you have valid grounds to claim compensation, you must do so within 3 years of the accident date or the date you obtained of knowledge that the injury was the fault of a third party. Otherwise, you could risk losing out on the chance to secure the payout that you deserve.

There are, in some cases, exceptions that can be made to this time limit. If a claimant is unable to make a claim for themselves, the time limit does not begin to come into effect until they gain the ability to make legal proceedings. For example, if a claimant lacks the mental capacity to claim, the time limit is frozen. In the meantime, they could appoint a litigation friend to act on their behalf, at which point, the normal time limit would begin.

The same applies to those under the age of 18. Minors can only represent themselves after they turn 18, at which point the 3-year limitation period commences. However, a litigation friend can represent them before this point too.

What Is A Partial Blindness Injury?

According to the NHS, there are around 2 million people living with sight loss, with a further 360,000 people registered as either blind or partially blind in the UK.

Partial blindness is a condition in which the victim loses some but not all of their vision. It could be the case that this condition is triggered by a pre-existing health condition but for the purposes of this guide, we’ll be discussing cases that arise as a result of injury.

Damage to the optic nerves, a rise in eye pressure or even head trauma can all result in a partial blindness injury. Some common symptoms can include unclear vision, being unable to identify shapes and colours, tunnel vision and weaker vision at night.

Nowadays, a medical procedure known as a vitrectomy can help to restore any loss of sight. However, even if this procedure is successful, it will still take some time for patients to regain their normal vision.. Patients can expect blurred vision for several weeks after surgery, with accompanied sensitivity and swelling in the area.

In short, if you suffer a partial blindness injury, it’s common to expect that your normal routine will be interrupted, even if only temporarily. As a result, you may be forced to take time off work amongst other things you usually do. Therefore, if your suffering is a result of someone else’s negligence, you could be able to make a claim for compensation. Please get in touch today to learn more and get a free consultation about your case.

In the meantime, please read on to see some specific examples of how to establish liability in different circumstances such as accidents at work, public place accidents and road traffic accidents.

How Can You Suffer A Partial Blindness Injury At Work?

If you suffer a partial blindness injury in a work-related accident, you could be entitled to compensation if you can prove that your employer was responsible for it. In order to establish whether you could have grounds to make a claim, the following criteria could help:

  • Did your employer owe you a legal duty of care?
  • Did your employer breach their duty to you?
  • Did you suffer your injury as a result?

Employer’s liability (EL) relates to the duty of care that employers owe their employees under the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. This duty is to ensure that employees are safe and free of the risk of harm, so far as reasonably possible.

This piece of legislation outlines the steps that employers must follow to help ensure their employees’ safety while at work. These include conducting regular maintenance checks and repairs, providing necessary training and personal protective equipment. An example may be an employee being asked to work with toxic chemicals at work without proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) from their employer.

If you’ve suffered a partial blindness injury in a work-related accident and you’d like to see if you could claim compensation, please get in touch today for a free consultation.

Partial Blindness Injury In A Public Place

Just as employers owe their employees a duty of care, so too do those in control of public places owe users of their space a duty of care too. Under the Occupiers’ Liability Act 1957, public liability (PL) is established. This outlines the steps that must be taken to help prevent public place accidents from happening.

For example, say you’re using outdoor gym equipment provided by your local park. If this equipment has been poorly maintained by the local council in control of the park, it could become a hazard. As a result, you could be flung from the gym equipment, suffering a traumatic head injury. The impact of the blow could affect your optic nerves to the extent of causing partial blindness.

In this case, you could have grounds to hold your local council liable for breaching their duty of care and causing you to suffer as a result.

How Can You Suffer A Partial Blindness Injury In A Road Traffic Accident?

If you suffer a partial blindness injury as a result of a road traffic accident, you could be entitled to compensation if you can prove that third-party negligence was responsible, whether that be another road user, the local council responsible for road maintenance or another third party altogether.

Under the Highway Code, all road users owe a common duty of care to one another, be that pedestrians, drivers, cyclists, motorcyclists or the like. If someone fails to uphold their duty, they could be held liable for any damage that this causes.

For example, if you’re involved in a car crash because another driver was looking at their phone and wasn’t paying proper attention to the roads, there is a risk you could suffer an injury as a result. A traumatic head injury could be sustained, which could in turn lead to partial blindness.

Whatever your situation, if you think you could be entitled to claim compensation, please get in touch for a free consultation today to see how we could help.

Learn About The Personal Injury Compensation Calculation Process

When making a personal injury claim, there are two different types of damage that could be used to generate your final settlement amount. The first is general damages, which covers compensation for your pain and suffering, and the second is special damages, which covers financial losses experienced as a result of your injury.

When calculating an award for general damages, both physical injuries and psychological harm will be taken into consideration. This can cover things such as the pain of your injury, the trauma of enduring treatment for it and any subsequent anxiety you suffered.

In addition, special damages could make-up the second part of your personal injury payout. Please see the next section of our guide for details on what types of costs you could recover by claiming special damages.

What Are Special Damages?

Special damages aim to reimburse any financial consequences of your partial blindness injury. For example, you may suffer a loss of earnings if the injury means that you’re unable to work and in turn, lose income. Other examples of costs incurred as a result of your injury that you could reclaim as part of special damages include:

  • Loss of future earnings
  • Medical bills for private treatment
  • Care costs for professional carers or care provided by family and friends
  • Domestic expenses for gardeners, cleaners, childcare and the like
  • Travel expenses to and from medical appointments
  • Home adaptations such as handrails, stairlifts and the like

Please note that having proof of any expenses incurred can help ensure that you are properly compensated for special damages. Without this evidence, you may not be able to build a strong case illustrating how your injury has affected you financially. With this in mind, try to save receipts, bank statements and the like as proof.

Case Study: £230,000 For A Partial Blindness Injury

Mrs Banning, 66, was shopping in a supermarket like she did every week when she was injured unexpectedly. While browsing one of the shopping aisles, one of the shelves above her gave way. As a result, a large quantity of stock fell from a height and struck her on the head, with the impact knocking her unconscious.

. It was only after she was taken to hospital when medics realised her vision had been impaired as a result of a traumatic head injury. In fact, Mrs Banning had been left partially blind.

Due to the severity of her injuries, treatment to cure Mrs Banning’s partial blindness was unsuccessful and she was left with some permanent vision loss. As a result of her injuries, Mrs Banning was unable to continue working. Instead, while she recovered, she had to hire help to assist her with day-to-day duties, such as cleaning and gardening, while her husband continued in his job.

As Mrs Banning knew her accident wasn’t her fault, she decided to pursue a personal injury claim. With help from a No Win No Fee solicitor, she was able to build a strong basis of evidence against the supermarket. As her case unfolded, Mrs Banning discovered that the supermarket failed to uphold their duty of care by not properly training staff. As a result, shelves were stacked unsafely, creating a hazard for shoppers.

After making a successful claim. Mrs Banning received an out-of-court settlement of £230,000, with £180,710 in general damages and £49,290 in special damages.

Edit
Type Of General Damages Includes: How Much?
Partial Blindness Costs of suffering a permanent vision impairment due to an accident £168,730
Concussion Costs of suffering head trauma from the accident £11,980
Edit
Type Of Special Damages Includes: How Much?
Lost Earnings Lost earnings from being unable to work any more as a police officer £36,000
Medical Costs Costs of medication during her initial recovery £5,000
Transport Costs Costs of using public transport for hospital appointments £600
Care Costs Costs of hiring a nurse to look after her at home during her initial recovery £1,500
Home Costs Costs of modifying the family home due to her injury £3,000
Car Costs Costs of modifying the family car due to her injury £2,000
Loss of work bonuses Loss of work bonuses such as an attendance bonus £1,190

Keep in mind that this story is not real and is just for the purpose of this guide.

Receive Free Legal Advice On Your Case From Us

After reading our case study about claiming for a partial blindness injury, you should have an idea of what’s involved in the claims process and what types of damage could be compensated.

If you’d like to learn whether you could have grounds to make a personal injury claim or you’d be interested in seeing what damage you could claim compensation for, please don’t hesitate to get in touch today for a free, no-obligation consultation on your case.

We’ll ask you a few questions about your situation and how you’ve suffered as a result. If we believe you could have a valid claim, we can connect you to our panel of personal injury lawyers. From there, you could have your case handled on a No Win No Fee basis by solicitors with decades of experience making successful claims for their clients.

To learn more about how this service could benefit you and how you could contact us today for your free consultation, please read on.

You Could Benefit From No Win No Fee Claims

If you’re thinking about getting legal help to give your claim the best chances of success, the prospect of solicitors’ fees could seem off-putting. However, with a No Win No Fee agreement, did you know you don’t have to pay any solicitors’ fees unless your claim is won?

What’s more, there are no upfront costs or hidden costs while your claim progresses and you only have to pay your solicitor once they win you your compensation. Therefore, their fees can be deducted from your final payout. There’s no need to worry about this ‘success fee’, however, as it’s capped by law so you can still get the compensation that you deserve.

To learn more about No Win No Fee agreements, please see the next section for details on how to get in touch with our team.

Our Specialist Free Legal Advice For You

Thank you for reading our partial blindness injury claims guide. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with our team of specialist advisors to get a free, no-obligation consultation about your case.

They’re available 24/7, 7 days a week and could connect you with our panel of No Win No Fee solicitors if you’d like help making a successful claim:

More Resources And Guides On Partial Blindness Injuries

Below, we’ve included some further links for you to follow if you’d like to learn more:

Partial Blindness Injury FAQs

What is a partial blindness injury?

Partial blindness means suffering an injury that leads to very limited vision, but not a complete loss of sight.

Can a partial blindness injury be cured?

Depending on the severity of each case, cases of partial blindness can often be cured if proper treatment is successful.

Could a head injury cause a partial blindness injury?

Head trauma with intracranial lesions could impact the optic nerves enough to cause partial blindness.

Is it possible to claim for a partial blindness injury?

Provided you can prove that third-party negligence was to blame for your suffering, you could be able to claim compensation for it.

 

Guide by KG

Edited by AS