When Am I Able To Claim Compensation If A Colleague Ran Over My Foot?

If you have been wondering, ‘Can I claim compensation if a colleague ran over my foot at work?’ this guide will set out the eligibility requirements that your case must meet in order to have a valid accident at work claim.

Additionally, within this guide, we will also give examples of when your employer may be liable for the foot injuries you suffered when a colleague ran over it. We will also share some examples of evidence that could be gathered and used to support a personal injury claim.

Furthermore, we will discuss how compensation may be calculated in workplace injury claims, as well as the different heads of loss that may from your settlement. Lastly, this guide will explore how one of the solicitors on our panel could help you with making a personal injury claim on a No Win No Fee basis.

You can contact our advisors today to receive free advice for your foot injury claim. They could also answer any additional questions you have about starting an accident at work claim.

To connect with them today, you can:

A foot in plaster propped up.

Browse Our Guide

  1. Can I Claim Compensation If A Colleague Ran Over My Foot?
  2. How Could Employer Negligence Cause A Workplace Accident?
  3. Evidence That Could Support A Personal Injury Claim
  4. How Much Crushed Foot Injury Compensation Could I Receive?
  5. Can I Claim Compensation If A Colleague Ran Over My Foot With A No Win No Fee Solicitor?
  6. Learn More About How To Claim For A Broken Foot

Can I Claim Compensation If A Colleague Ran Over My Foot?

The Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (HASAWA) states that your employer owes you a duty of care while you are working. They need to take reasonable measures to help prevent you from coming to harm while you are working. This could include performing regular maintenance checks and risk assessments.

However, you may be wondering, ‘Can I claim compensation if a colleague ran over my foot at work?’. As aforementioned, as part of your employer’s duty of care, they must help ensure your safety within the workplace by taking steps such as ensuring all employees have received relevant training to complete their work duties. Should they fail to adhere to this duty, and you suffer injuries as a result, they could be held liable. In the next section, we will provide some examples of when your employer may be liable for your injuries when your foot was run over by a colleague.

To have a valid personal injury claim, you must be able to prove:

  1. A duty of care was owed to you by your employer.
  2. They breached this duty.
  3. Their breach caused you to suffer your foot injury.

Furthermore, under Section 7 of HASAWA, a duty of care is placed upon you as an employee to take reasonable care of your own and other’s safety while in the workplace. This may include following the rules and regulations that have been implemented by your employer, as well as adhering to any training they have given you.

Contact our advisors today to see whether you may be eligible to make a claim for your workplace injury.

How Could Employer Negligence Cause A Workplace Accident?

There are various accidents that could cause you to suffer a foot injury within the workplace. However, as previously mentioned, to be able to make a claim for your colleague injuring your foot due to them running over it, you would need to demonstrate that your employer was liable.

Examples of how this may occur include:

  • A colleague who was not properly trained to operate a vehicle ran over your foot. This can cause severe crush injuries and potential amputation.
  • Your employer instructed your colleague to operate a forklift that had faulty breaks. Your employer was aware of this issue and had made no steps to fix or replace these breaks. As a result, your colleague was unable to stop the vehicle in time and you suffered a broken foot when they ran over it,
  • Your employer failed to implement any designated walkways in the warehouse where you work. Due to this, a colleague runs over your foot with a work vehicle and you suffer fractures in your forefoot and toes.

These are only a few examples. To discuss your particular case, you can contact our advisors. They can assess your eligibility to claim as well as provide you with free advice.

Evidence That Could Support A Personal Injury Claim

When making a workplace accident claim, you will need to provide evidence to prove an injury at work occurred due to your employer failing to adhere to their duty of care.

Examples of evidence that could be collated for foot injury claims include:

  • Any CCTV footage that is available which shows the accident.
  • Witness contact details who could provide a statement at a later date.
  • A copy of the report made in the workplace accident book.
  • Copies of your medical records detailing the type of foot injury you suffered and the medical treatment you received for it.

A personal injury solicitor from our panel could help you with gathering evidence to support your accident at work compensation claim. To see if you could work with one of them today, contact our advisors.

An orange forklift truck.

How Much Crushed Foot Injury Compensation Could I Receive?

If you make a successful compensation claim for your personal injury, two separate heads of loss can make up the settlement.

General damages is the first head of loss and it is awarded in all successful cases. It compensates for the pain and suffering you have endured due to your foot injury.

A document called the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG) may be used by those responsible for valuing your injuries to help them. The JCG provides guideline compensation brackets for a variety of injuries.

For the table below, we have listed the entries that correlate with foot injuries. Please only use it for guidance. It should also be noted that the first entry has not been taken from the JCG.

Guideline Compensation Brackets

Area of InjurySeverityNotesAward Guideline
Severe Multiple Injuries and Special DamagesSevere This award would reflect multiple types of injury that are severe. Also included are special damage amounts for lost earnings, care costs and adaptations needed at home.Up to £1 million +
Foot(a) Amputation of Both FeetTreated similarly to a below-knee amputation due to the loss of useful ankle joints.£169,400 to £201,490
(b) Amputation of One FootLikewise, this award takes into account the loss of the useful ankle joint.£83,960 to £109,650
(c) Very Severe Permanent and severe pain or very serious permanent disability due to an injury such as the traumatic amputation of the forefoot.£83,960 to £109,650
(d) Severe Fractures to both heels or feet plus a substantial restriction on mobility with permanent and considerable pain.£41,970 to £70,030
(e) SeriousLess severe injuries but still leading to pain and risk of traumatic arthritis.£24,990 to £39,200
(f) Moderate Displaced metatarsal fractures that cause permanent deformity and symptoms that continue.£13,740 to £24,990
(g) ModestSimple metatarsal fractures, puncture wounds and ruptured ligaments causing a continuing level of pain, aching or a limp.Up to £13,740
Toes(a) Amputation of All ToesAward depends on if the amputation was surgical or traumatic and the extent to which the forefoot has been affected.£36,520 to £56,080
(c) Severe Toe InjuriesCrush injuries that are severe that lead to amputation of one or two toes (not including the great toe) as well as bursting wounds and injuries.£13,740 to £21,070
(d) Serious Toe InjuriesSerious crush injuries to the big toe or two or more toes have suffered multiple fractures.£9,600 to £13,740

Claiming Special Damages In An Accident At Work Claim

Special damages are the second head of loss that can form part of your compensation. This compensates for any financial losses caused by the injury. To prove these costs, you will need evidence in the form of receipts, payslips and bank statements. Below are some examples of costs you could be reimbursed for under special damages:

  • Both past and future loss of earnings if you had to take time off work or if your injury made you unable to work.
  • Domestic care costs.
  • Medical expenses, such as prescription fees.
  • Home modifications, such as wheelchair access or grab-bars.
  • Travel costs to essential appointments.

To receive a free valuation of how much compensation you may be able to receive for your particular claim, you can contact our advisors.

Can I Claim Compensation If A Colleague Ran Over My Foot With A No Win No Fee Solicitor?

Provided you have a valid accident at work claim, one of the solicitors on our panel could help you with your case. In addition to guiding you through the claims process, they may also offer you a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA).

This is a form of No Win No Fee contract that comes with many benefits, such as:

  • Nothing to pay upfront for your solicitor to begin working on the case.
  • As the claim progresses, there are no service fees to pay.
  • Should the claim fail, your solicitor will not ask you to pay for their services.
  • Following a successful personal injury claim, your solicitor will be due a success fee. They will take this from your compensation as a small and legally limited percentage.

Someone asking a solicitor 'Can I claim compensation if a colleague ran over my foot?'.

Contact Our Team

To see if one of the personal injury solicitors on our panel could help you with claiming compensation, you can contact our advisory team. They can also answer any additional questions you may have about the claims process.

To discuss your potential personal injury compensation claim with one of them today, you can:

  • Call 0161 696 9685
  • Contact us online to receive a callback.
  • Or ask us a question about claiming, using our live chat.

Learn More About How To Claim For A Broken Foot

Additional personal injury claims guides by us:

Additional information can be found here:

Contact our advisors today if you are still wondering, ‘Can I claim compensation if a colleague ran over my foot?’ and they could check the eligibility of your case.