No Manual Handling Training At Work Caused An Accident – When Could You Claim?

No Manual Handling Training At Work Compensation Claims

No Manual Handling Training At Work – Injury Compensation Claims

Have you sustained an injury because you did not receive manual handling training at work? You could be eligible to claim. 

Employers owe their employees a duty of care which we will provide more clarity on later in this guide. To be able to claim, you must be able to prove that: 

  • You were owed a duty of care 
  • It was breached 
  • You were injured due to the breach

A successful personal injury claim will not only compensate you for any injuries sustained, but it could also consider any financial losses incurred because of your injuries.

We will provide you with all of the information you may need to make a claim. Such as what evidence could be useful, how long you have to begin your personal injury claim and what health and safety legislation you could use to support your case.

Additionally, we will explore specific examples of accidents at work, the type of injuries that could be sustained and the impact these could have on your life.

When pursuing a personal injury claim following an accident at work, you may be curious as to how much compensation you could be awarded should your claim be successful. Below you will find a compensation table that contains injuries, their severities and guideline award amounts.

Speak with an advisor from our team who can offer free legal advice 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 

To contact a member of our team: 

  • Call our helpline on 0161 696 9685
  • Contact us online to request a callback
  • Use the live chat in the bottom right of the page

Select A Section

  1. A Guide To Manual Handling Injuries At Work
  2. Manual Handling Training At Work Requirements
  3. Industries At Risk Of Manual Handling Injuries
  4. Why Do Manual Handling Injuries Occur?
  5. What Could You Claim After A Manual Handling Accident?
  6. Talk To Us About No Win No Fee Claims For No Manual Handling Training At Work Accidents

A Guide To Manual Handling Injuries At Work 

Manual handling training at work is required in any job where you need to lift, lower, pull or push any object that carries risk of injury.

The training should be specific to the type of handling that will be performed within the job. According to the Health and Safety Executive’s guidance, the training should cover: 

  • Manual handling risk factors 
  • How injuries could occur
  • Instructions on how to use mechanical aids 
  • How to safely carry out manual handling 
  • A practical task to address any potential issues after the training 

It is important to receive this training to ensure you are carrying out tasks correctly, which will reduce the risk of injury. If your employer does not provide you with the training that is required to do your job safely and you suffer an injury, they could be liable. 

If you want to know more about claiming for an injury due to no manual handling training at work, please contact an advisor from our team. 

Manual Handling Training At Work Requirements 

The duty of care that employers owe their employees is established by the Health and Safety At Work etc Act 1974. According to this legislation, employers must take reasonable steps to protect the health and safety of employees. 

Furthermore, the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 was introduced to reduce musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) that arise from manual handling at work. An employer is expected to, where reasonably possible, avoid any manual handling operations that pose the risk of injury. If this is not possible, then the risk of injury should be reduced as much as possible.

Industries At Risk Of Manual Handling Injuries 

Manual handling training at work is important across many professions to allow you to do your job safely. For example: 

  • A warehouse or factory job
  • While working as a mechanic
  • Retail jobs, including kitchen and bar staff 
  • Shipping workers 
  • Delivery couriers 
  • Labourers 

If you work in any of the areas provided above and you have suffered an injury due to a lack of manual handling training, do not hesitate to speak with our team.

Why Do Manual Handling Injuries Occur? 

There are multiple ways that receiving no or improper manual handling training at work could cause an injury. Here are some examples: 

  • Your employer does not provide you with the correct manual handling training when you start the job. When you are tasked with moving heaving boxes around the warehouse, you use the wrong technique and suffer a back injury
  • An employee is not given manual handling training. Subsequently, they drop several boxes enduring a leg injury
  • Your boss does not inform you of the maximum weight allowance when doing heavy manual lifting. Consequently, you attempt to lift boxes that are too heavy, slip and fall and sustain a hand injury

Please contact our advisors for more information on whether you are eligible to claim following an injury caused by no manual handling training. 

What Could You Claim After A Manual Handling Accident? 

If you make a successful claim after injuring yourself due to a lack of manual handling training at work, the compensation you are awarded may include two heads of claim. Firstly, you could receive general damages for any physical or psychological injuries sustained. 

For instance, you might be compensated for a back injury. If the injury leaves you unable to work and increases your stress or anxiety levels, this could also be included in your payout. 

We have compiled a table of compensation amounts that are made available via the Judicial College Guidelines (JCG). The JCG is a document that is used by legal professionals to help them value claims. 

However, these amounts should only be taken as rough guidance due to each workplace injury claim being unique. 

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Body Part Severity Compensation Bracket Details
Head Moderate (ii) £90,720 to £150,110 An injury that leads to moderate to modest intellectual impacts, the ability to work being majorly reduced or removed and some risk of epilepsy.
Back Severe (ii) £74,160 to £88,430 Damage to nerve roots resulting in hindered mobility and loss of sensation.
Back Minor (i) £7,890 to £12,510 Where the back has fully recovered or recovered to nuisance level with no surgery being required within a timeframe of 2-5 years.
Hand Serious Damage to Both Hands £55,820 to £84,570 Serious damage to both hands that causes permanent cosmetic disability in conjunction with the loss of function.
Hand Severe Fractures to Fingers Up to £36,740 Severe fractures to fingers that may lead to partial amputations and result in impairment of grip and of mechanical function.
Arm Injuries Resulting in Permanent and Substantial Disablement £39,170 to £59,860 A considerable fracture to one or both forearms which leads to considerable continuing residual disability whether functionally or cosmetically.
Wrist Significant Permanent Disability £24,500 to £39,170 An injury that results in considerable permanent disability but some useful function is still present.
Wrist Fracture In the region of £7,430 An uncomplicated Colles’ fracture.
Leg Less serious (i) £17,960 to £27,760 A fracture that does not completely recover or serious soft tissue injuries.
Foot Moderate £13,740 to £24,990 A displaced metatarsal that results in continuous symptoms, for example permanent deformity.

Additionally, you could be awarded special damages if you encounter any monetary harm as a result of your injuries. For example, you might be unable to drive if you suffer an arm injury. Any travel expenses incurred until a recovery is made might be covered by special damages. 

It could also reimburse you for: 

  • Loss of earnings 
  • Home adaptations 
  • Care costs 
  • Medical expenses 

It is advisable to keep a record of all financial losses sustained via receipts, invoices or bank statements to be used as evidence. 

For more details in relation to how much compensation you could be awarded for your potential claim, please speak with an advisor from our team. 

Talk To Us About No Win No Fee Claims For No Manual Handling Training At Work Accidents 

A personal injury solicitor from our panel could agree to take on your case on a No Win No Fee basis. A common type of No Win No Fee agreement is a Conditional Fee Agreement (CFA). Under this fee arrangement, you generally won’t have to pay any fees upfront or while your claim is ongoing.

Furthermore, you only have to pay a success fee if your case is successful. In this instance, a legally capped success fee will be subtracted from the compensation you are awarded and paid to your solicitor. Whereas if your case is unsuccessful, you typically won’t have to pay.

If you would like to find out whether you are eligible to be represented on this basis, please speak with our team. They can offer you free legal advice and might connect you with an accident at work solicitor from our panel if you have a valid claim. 

To speak with an advisor:

  • Call our helpline on 0161 696 9685
  • Contact us online to request a callback
  • Use the live chat in the bottom right of the page 

Related Workplace Accident Claims Guides

We have provided you with some more of our guides relative to accident at work claims

In addition, we have included further reading that could be of use to you: 

Thanks for reading this guide on claiming if you have been injured due to a lack of manual handling training at work.